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Moebius Story Leidecker, Familiar’ Album To Be Released On October 6th

Brett Allen, of SnowGhost Music, was honored to serve as the audio engineer for one of Deiter Moebius’ later projects. Recorded at SnowGhost Studio, ’Moebius Story Leidecker, Familiar’ is set for release on October 6th, 2017 and is a collaboration between Jon Leidecker of Negativeland fame, and Deiter Moebius of Cluster. It is an album that explores the juxtaposition between the natural and artificial world and was inspired by a few days of hiking in Glacier National Park, Montana. I grew up listening to a significant number of bands who were directly influenced by the Krautrock bands of the late 60’s and early 70’s. I was born in the early 70’s so it makes sense that I was listening to the next generation of bands that followed suit. Once I realized the origins of influence, I took a trip back in time to explore the forefathers of the avant-garde. Krautrock was a movement that was given it’s ‘name’ in jest by John Peel, and the name stuck. An important fact that should be mentioned by anyone writing about the genre is that Krautrock was originally a form of free art. Krautrock bands gave their records away at free art fairs. […]

Congratulations to the ‘Lil Smokies’ on Their New Release ‘Changing Shades’

All of us at SnowGhost Music would like to congratulate you on the release of your new album ‘Changing Shades’. It was such a fun record to make and we are extremely pleased to see it out in the world today. The musicianship and cohesiveness of this band is astonishing. The album was live-tracked in a little over two days and completely finished, mixed and mastered in eight. It is a production approach that we strongly promote and believe in and we were fortunate enough to have a band like the Lil’ Smokies in to elevate the bar for live analog recording. There’s a great interview with lead vocalist Andy about the recording process in the Missoulian. Best of luck as you travel the world sharing your music and yourselves. I hope that all of the people who hear these songs will experience as much happiness listening to them as we did making the record with you. All the best!  

‘SnowGhost Stories of Sound’ pilot episode, INTO THE DARK to debut at Google’s ‘Playtime 2017’ developer’s conference:

We are excited to announce the upcoming release of our spatial audio content series called ‘SnowGhost Stories of Sound’. This VR content series utilizes audio as the driver of narrative to tell compelling stories in 28.4 spatial sound. Unlike a traditional audiobook or podcast, the SnowGhost experience is designed to transport the listener into the story or scene as if they were actually there. For context, consider the storytelling format of Prairie Home Companion, in which the author or storyteller is able to expand their characters and plot using rich audio content to create a theatrical experience that is much larger than the story’s words. Utilizing the spatial audio format, SnowGhost elevates the audio storytelling experience to a new level. SnowGhost will debut their first episode, ‘Into The Dark’ , at Playtime 2017, Google Play’s annual developer conference. The event will take place October 19th at Envelop, a live spatial audio event space that is located in The Midway in San Francisco’s bourgeoning Dogpatch neighborhood and will be experienced exclusively at Playtime 2017.

Thalpein: Music by Kirk Cornelius + Brett Allen. Video by Trevan Strean

Thalpein is an audio composition arranged in three variations of dimensional sound that unfolds over the span of 31 minutes and 21 seconds. This piece was composed for a video installation art piece in collaboration with artist Lana Vogestad and will be shown in various gallery spaces in the upcoming months. The composition itself was first sketched out on a sketchpad in the middle of the night – which can be seen in the image to your left. The sketch shows three natural environments: Underwater, surface area, and atmosphere. The atmosphere took on an orbital role in creating a 3-dimensional component surrounding the other layers, with the third layer being contained in the 3-dimensional ‘atmospheric’ sphere. Brett was brought in to help determine how to creatively move forward with the sound design and spatial audio strategy. In order to simulate the unobservable real-time nature of this particular phenomenon, we performed this piece using analog instruments and effects over an extended period of time. We decided to build an instrument using a combination of instruments, providing us with various sound options that enabled us to perform the entire piece live. As we listened over time, there was a strong connection to the imperfections. […]

Everything In Its Right Place

Associated Article: http://www.openculture.com/2016/07/brian-eno-explains-the-loss-of-humanity-in-modern-music.html In the age of algorithmic curation, artificial intelligence, and the promise of ‘personalization’, there is a phenomenon taking place that is pushing people forward with more considered intention. Technologists continue to create conceptual products that represent a future world where machines will be making the ‘right’ decisions where the humans are unable to do so due to inherent flaws as a result of varying values, judgement and degrees of critical thinking or lack thereof. One’s quality of life equation or moral genetic make-up is drastically different based on what they value and why they value those things. There is an etiquette to intimacy, it takes time to establish trust, which varies significantly based on the dynamics of each individual. The “rate of trust’ is dependent upon each exchange and experience. AI assistants are learning strictly on a need-to-know basis as they gather information to point them towards specific outcomes, however, lack the ability to ‘read the room’. They are unable to find beauty in the unconventional and abstract, the unexpected mistakes and the subtle nuances of life that often become the greatest influencers of joy and happiness – the ‘simple pleasures’. In a world of ‘right’, the […]

There Have Been a Lot of Promises Made…

In late 2008, my wife and I were in London for work and decided to spend one of our days off at the Tate Modern. For whatever reason, we hadn’t really done any research ahead of time, but had planned on simply enjoying the visit to the museum in general, which is quite impressive in its own right. When we arrived, we noticed that there was a Mark Rothko exhibit highlighted as one of the featured exhibits at that time. Rothko, in my mind, conjured up images of cheaply framed college dorm posters, sitting along side a variety of band posters of The Cure and Echo & The Bunnymen. Rothko had achieved a level of fame that most artists will not achieve in their lifetime, he had become a household name for most. He was one of a few artists who broke through into the mainstream, making his work easily recognizable by most. Consequently, I didn’t think much about the exhibit since I felt that I had probably seen most of his work in some form or another, but do remember thinking that it might be nice to see the paintings in person since we were there. We made our […]